Finalist, Sony Impact Award for Current Affairs Sponsored by Sony Impact Award for Current Affairs

Siraj Al Deen Al Omar, Mojahed Abo Al Jood, Basim Ayyoubi and Ahmad Hashisho (Syrian)

November - December 2016, Syria

Goodbye Aleppo

Commissioned and broadcast by BBC Arabic

The story of the fall of East Aleppo told through the personal experiences of four young Syrian journalists. Siraj, Mojahed, Basim and Ahmad were commissioned by the BBC to film themselves and each other during the last days of East Aleppo as the Syrians, Russians, Iranians, and Iran-backed militias took the city from opposition fighters in December 2016. Their cameras reveal what life is like for a population under siege as the city is about to fall, bombarded from the air and encircled by troops. The battle for Aleppo was one of the most important battles in the Syrian civil war. This film captures the immediacy of events through the personal insights of four young men.
 

BIOGRAPHIES: 

Siraj Al Deen Al Omar is 24 years old and was born in Aleppo. He has freelanced for BBC Arabic, BBC News and Current Affairs, and Al Buraq Media, a local news agency in Aleppo. He now lives in Azaz, Syria.

Ahmad Hashisho is 24 and was born in Aleppo. He has freelanced for CNN, Orient News, Sky News Arabia, TRT World, Al Araby TV, BBC Arabic, BBC News and Current Affairs, Anadolu Agency, and Al Buraq Media. He now lives in Idlib Province.
 
Basim Ayyoubi is 24 and was born in Aleppo. He has freelanced for Al Jazeera English, ABC News, TRT, Orient TV, Al Araby Al Jadid, BBC Arabic and BBC Current Affairs and Al-Buraq Media. He now lives in Turkey where he works with Images Live, a photo agency. 

Mojahed Abo Al Jood is 22 years old. He has freelanced for ITV News, CNN, Sky News Arabia, Al’An (Now) News, BBC Arabic, and BBC News and Current Affairs. He lives in Turkey and works with the Aleppo Media Centre, the Media organisation he also worked with in Aleppo. 
 

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Judges Comments

“This is the most intimate, gripping and moving work we could see of these last days in Aleppo. It is like a love story, a love diary, to their city and to something they will lose forever. It’s emotional, often heartbreaking - and sometimes almost humorous - storytelling, but the film carefully steers clear of being sentimental or whimsical. The cameramen don’t sensationalise the situation and at no point does it feel like campaigning journalism. Nothing has taken me closer to feeling this story. A superb, a tremendous film.”