Iraqi Kurdistan: Medical Trauma Training

In September 2014, the Trust funded a three-day medical trauma training workshop for freelance journalists living and working in the Kurdistan region of Northern Iraq.



"We could not have had a better experience with RPT. They understood what we wanted to do, encouraged us, and met our almost impossible deadline to get everything in place in time for the course. They enabled us to prove that our concepts were viable and that this type of project could be delivered with volunteers in an economically efficient way." 

- Neal Jackson, educator and Chairman Emeritus of VII Photo Agency.
Every year, freelance journalists are killed and injured covering events in their own countries. Yet many have no access to medical training and lack the skills to know what to do in an emergency.

In September 2014, the Trust funded a medical trauma workshop for freelance journalists living and working in Iraqi Kurdistan.  The recent invasion of Islamic State forces into the region had increased the dangers for journalists working there, but it had also prompted an increase in newsgathering.  News outlets were relying on local journalists and fixers, most of whom were untrained in medical trauma and first aid.

The workshop was the idea of Neal Jackson, educator and Chairman Emeritus of VII photo agency.  He pulled together a voluntary team of experienced trainers including a former US Army medic and Erbil-based surgeons and doctors.

Over three days at Erbil's Swedish Speciality hospital, freelancers learned the basics of emergency medicine - how to treat and assess common combat injuries, manage shock and use a medical kit.  And at the end of the course, each participant was given their own personal medical kit containining essential supplies. 

The course was run by Talking Eyes Media.
All images copyright Jodi Hilton.

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